Archive for October, 2011

Chili time again!

Posted in Rock Rant with tags , , , , , , on October 29, 2011 by 30daysout

Editor’s note: This is a repost of a previous entry – kinda like a warmed up bowl of chili. 

We have done this post a few times but with cold, chilly weather gripping most of the country it seems like staying home and makin’ a big pot o’ chili is a good idea.  And with football season in full swing, it is especially timely.

The classic recipe, supplied by the good folks who brew Texas’ Lone Star Beer, is available above (click the picture for a larger version).  It’s pretty simple, but here is another recipe from the Austin newspaper that is a multi-meat extravaganza.  Just for fun (and, depending where you live, for ridicule) here are some chili recipes from the Food Network. One of the recipes has spaghetti!

On that last link above, you will notice of course that some of these chili recipes contain a healthy helping of beans.  As a native Texan, it is my duty to remind you that our state’s fine lawmakers some years ago passed a law outlawing the use of beans in chili.  I can’t tell you exactly when and, ah, … OK, I just made up that last part.

Just put in the damn beans if that’s what blows up your skirt.  But don’t blame me if that’s also what blows out your skirt.  Either way, keep a window open – no matter how cold it may be outside.

More stuff about chili, with a few more tunes, here.

MP3: “The Chili Song” by Gary P. Nunn

MP3: “Snow (Hey Oh)” by the Red Hot Chili Peppers

MP3: “National Chili Anthem” by Isaac Peyton Sweat

MP3: “Cold As Ice” (live) by Foreigner

MP3: “The Old Country Waltz” by Neil Young

MP3: “Chili Con Conga” by Cab Calloway

MP3: “You Bring The Heat, I’ll Bring The Meat” by Jonny Z and Bobby Rivera

MP3: “Crusty Rolls and Chili” by the Duhks

MP3: “Cold Cold Heart” by Hank Williams

MP3: “Millie Make Some Chili” by Steve Goodman

MP3: “White Winter Hymnal” by Fleet Foxes

MP3: “Hot Chili” by the Steve Miller Band

It Came From Halloween – The Misfits

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , , , , on October 27, 2011 by 30daysout

Shouldn’t let a Halloween go by without paying tribute to the Misfits.  The creators of horror punk movement, the Misfits came out of the swamps of New Jersey in 1977 and are still goin’ strong, more or less.  Less singer/songwriter Glenn Danzig, who wrote many of their early songs; less Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein and Michale Graves, who played on the Misfits’ major-label album American Psycho; and without Marky Ramone, who played drums for the Misfits for a while.

The Misfits today are led by bassist/singer Jerry Only, immediately identifiable by his “devillock” hairstyle, guitarist Dez Cadena and drummer Robo (both formerly of punk titans Black Flag).  We’re gonna go see the Misfits in November when they roll through Houston, you should see them too when they come to your town.

MP3: “Twilight Of The Dead” by the Misfits

MP3: “Astro Zombies” by the Misfits

MP3: “Night Of The Living Dead” by the Misfits

MP3: “Die, Die My Darling” by the Misfits

MP3: “Horror Hotel” by the Misfits

MP3: “From Hell They Came” by the Misfits

MP3: “On A Wicked Night” by Danzig

MP3: “Dawn Of The Dead” by Michale Graves

MP3: “Halloween II” by the Misfits

MP3: “The Devil’s Rain” by the Misfits

Video: “Dig Up Her Bones” by the Misfits

Vodpod videos no longer available.

The Misfits official website


Video Du Jour: U2 and Bruce Springsteen

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , on October 26, 2011 by 30daysout

The Best of Rock & Roll Hall of Fame + Museum Live is a 3-CD set featuring rare, one-of-a-kind performances from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, recorded since its start in 1986. The biggest names in rock and roll performed in intimate settings, jamming in combinations not seen anywhere else.

One of the album’s highlights teams Bruce Springsteen with U2 as he inducted the Irish band into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005. That performance joins nearly 200 others in a special 10-volume digital-only collection arriving at iTunes on Nov. 15 and the 51-song 3-CD set available Nov. 1.

Live: ZZ Top/Lynyrd Skynyrd, Austin

Posted in Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 23, 2011 by 30daysout

Dusty Hill, left, Frank Beard and Billy Gibbons tearin' it up in Austin. (Photo by Jave Del Rosario)

There was all kinds of stuff goin’ on this weekend in Austin – the amazing Texas Book Festival, the always-popular Austin Film Fest, the Austin Record Convention and the nicer-if-it’s-a-nice day Gypsy Festival showcasing the city’s food trailers. So what was our big event of the weekend? The so-called “First Annual La Grange Fest,” featuring ZZ Top and Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Austin has a semi-new outdoor venue called the Backyard – kind of new, because they closed the old one and rebuilt a new one in a different location in the hills west of the city. It holds about 7,500 people and although I don’t think they had that kind of attendance Saturday night it sure seemed that way.

Lynyrd Skynyrd's (from left) Johnny Van Zant, Rickey Medlocke, Peter Keys (on piano) and Gary Rossington.

Nobody really followed a theme for the “First Annual La Grange Fest,” but former Slipknot and Stone Sour lead singer Corey Taylor, who opened the whole shebang, seemed to set a good tone with his acoustic covers including the Rolling Stones’ “Dead Flowers” and Tom Petty’s “You Got Lucky.” He even turned the Ramones’ “Outsiders” into a rousing country-rock anthem.

I wasn’t too impressed with Jamey Johnson, who is a more conventional country singer with an “outlaw” attitude. He has some nice tunes which he wraps with a gorgeous George Jones-style baritone, but his material tended to be a little slow and plodding for my tastes.

When he yielded the stage the sun was goin’ down, and out came the Confederate flags for Lynyrd Skynyrd. Sporting only one original member (guitarist Gary Rossington) Skynyrd didn’t disappoint. Lead singer Johnny Van Zant pandered to the crowd with his big rebel and U.S. flags and constant points up to the sky (acknowledgement of the “man up there.” Who? Ronnie? Who knows?).

A patron of the arts performs his interpretive dance to Skynyrd.

The Skynyrd encore began with Van Zant asking the crowd, “As my older brother Ronnie would say, ‘What song is it you want to hear?’ ” and the crowd responded with … yes, “Free Bird.”  But during the long guitar duel between Rossington, Rickey Medlocke and Houston’s own Mark “Sparky” Matejka, a disco ball dropped down from the stage rafters and sprayed everyone with tiny little shards of light. Is that some kind of comment? Dunno.

ZZ Top hit the stage with thunder and flash, with “Got Me Under Pressure” and “Waitin’ On The Bus.” Gibbons donned a “blues hat” over his African cap and snarled through “Cheap Sunglasses” and “I’m Bad, I’m Nationwide” before performing a rousing “Hey Joe,” as a tribute to his old mentor Jimi Hendrix. Then, of course, the show wound down with the MTV hits “Gimme All Your Lovin’,” “Legs” and “Sharp Dressed Man.” The only thing left for the Top was to come out for the encore and romp through an extended “La Grange” (the only reference to the festival theme) and “Tush.”

The ZZ Top set was broadcast live on Sirius XM Outlaw Country, the first time in the band’s 40 years that they have participated in a real-time live radio broadcast. It may have been a good idea to listen on the radio – while this place the Backyard is an OK venue, the parking lot is a nightmare. We hung in a traffic jam for more than an hour and as a result it was a long 20-mile drive back to Austin. Everything else was all right at the Backyard, but that traffic issue was a cluster f**k.

Thanks to Jave Del Rosario for helping us out with some cool photos! The best ones here are his!

Billy Gibbons with ZZ Top drummer Frank Beard.

Guess whose setlist.

Rickey Medlocke of Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Lynyrd Skynyrd's disco ball during the guitar onslaught of "Free Bird."

Forgot your camera? Any old iPad will work.

Hill and Gibbons.

Yep, again.

Frank Beard, one of the best rock drummers around.

Hey, that's movie director Robert Rodriguez in the background!

The Backyard is a cozy little place with mesquite trees and a big Texas sky.

Man, this is just wrong.

One more. Thanks Jave!

YouTube: “Hey Joe” by ZZ Top

YouTube: “Free Bird” by Lynyrd Skynyrd

YouTube: Corey Taylor

It Came From Halloween – Scary Rock and Roll!

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 20, 2011 by 30daysout

Alice Cooper and friend

Face it – rock and roll isn’t that scary.  Unless you’re an uptight parent, or some kind of preacher.  Rock music about Halloween, and the stuff that comes with Halloween, is goofy and funny, but it isn’t frightening.  Although I must admit, I got a bit of a fright the first time I saw Adam Lambert perform … but thankfully that’s not rock and roll.  Or is it?  Bwahahahaha!

Back in the day, there was Alice Cooper.  He had an act that involved boa constrictors, decapitating baby dolls with a guillotine (or something) and an electric chair.  Alice also had Top 40 hits – “I’m Eighteen,” “School’s Out” and “No More Mr. Nice Guy” among them.  Successful, certainly; entertaining, probably.  But scary?  No.

Before Alice, back in the 1950s, there was Screamin’ Jay Hawkins.  He jumped in and out of a coffin during his stage act, performed fake voodoo rituals and had some pretty crazy music.  But his snake wasn’t even real.  After Alice, you can take your pick among the punk rockers of the late 1970s: they were kind of disturbing, but honestly not scary.  And from the 1990s, you had Marilyn Manson – the less said about him the better.

So by default, I guess Alice Cooper is the scariest guy in rock and roll.  Unless you count Adam Lambert …

MP3: “Black Juju” by Alice Cooper

MP3: “Feast of the Mau Mau” by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins

MP3: “Excitable Boy” (live) by Warren Zevon

MP3: “Frankenstein” (live) by Edgar Winter

MP3: “Don’t Fear The Reaper” by Blue Öyster Cult

MP3: “Skeletons In The Closet” by Alice Cooper

MP3: “Skull Ring” by Iggy Pop w/the Stooges

MP3: “Screamin’ Ball (At Dracula Hall)” by the Duponts

MP3: “Haunted House” by Jumpin’ Gene Simmons

MP3: “The Blob” by the Five Blobs

MP3: “This Is Halloween” by Danny Elfman

MP3: “Bo Meets The Monster” by Bo Diddley

MP3: “Witch Queen of New Orleans” by Redbone

MP3: “Hallowed Be My Name” by Alice Cooper

MP3: “Iron Man” by Black Sabbath

MP3: “Monster Motion” by Bobby “Boris” Pickett

MP3: “Out Of Limits” by the Challengers

MP3: “Purple People Eater” by Sheb Wooley

MP3: “Here Comes The Bride (The Bride of Frankenstein)” by Elvira, Mistress Of The Dark

MP3: “Ghostbusters” by Ray Parker Jr.


Son of Son of Son of Halloween

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , , , , , , on October 14, 2011 by 30daysout

Monsters are misunderstood – it’s tough to frighten people and terrorize the countryside day in, and day out.  Surely monsters have to unwind; as the magazine cover suggests, they may enjoy a little recreational hula-hoop activity.  Or they may just like to rock out.

MP3: “Cha-Cha With The Zombies” by the Upperclassmen

MP3: “Zombie Walk” by the Magics

MP3: “Do The Zombie” by the Symbols

MP3: “Igor Goes Surfing” by The Deadly Ones

MP3: “Frankenstein Walk” by Gene “Bowlegs” Miller

MP3: “Zombie Stomp” by Billy Gholston

MP3: “The Green Slime” by Richard Delvy

MP3: “Scream” by the Tumblers

MP3: “Mummy’s Little Monster” by Frankie Stein and His Ghouls

MP3: “The Mummy” by Bob McFadden and Dor

MP3: “He Never Came Back” by the Ventures

MP3: “The Exorcist” by the Devils

MP3: “Wolfman” by Randy Fuller (Not this guyThis guy!)

MP3: “Thank You, Thing” by the Fiends

YouTube: “The Green Slime” from the 1968 movie


Deep South: R. L. Burnside

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags on October 13, 2011 by 30daysout

R.L. Burnside at Houston's Continental Club, 2000.

Bluesman R.L. Burnside is definitely an acquired taste: when he was alive and stompin’, R.L. was as raw and rowdy as the Mississippi juke joints he played in most of his life. But he remains one of America’s purest bluesmen, one who ought to be ranked alongside greats like Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf.

Burnside played music since the 1960s, but nobody really paid attention until 30 years later. Certainly it was the album A Ass Pocket of Whiskey (1996), recorded with white-boy blues revisionist Jon Spencer and his Blues Explosion, that made R. L. go nationwide. The music on Ass Pocket is hilariously profane and unpolished to the point that calling it “lo-fi” might be a stretch. With Spencer howling in the background, Burnside yells the blues like one bad mother***er, which incidentally is a word he uses often on this album.

When we finally got to see R. L. play live, on a cool winter night in 2000, he didn’t drop the “mf” bomb once. By that time, one supposes, R. L. was trying to clean up his act. He told a few stories between songs, but they weren’t as wildly nasty as the “toasts” he committed to tape for Ass Pocket. Many people’s favorite was “The Criminal Inside Me,” which begins as a “Signifying Monkey” kind of story then spins wildly out of control as Spencer and R. L. scream at each other. Classic!

But live as on record, R. L. could play the blues. He had with him a great slide guitar player Kenny Brown, and his grandson Cedric Burnside was a monster on the drums. I couldn’t tell you the titles of most of the tunes R. L. played that night; most were just obscure blues tunes he most likely pulled out of his ass pocket on the spur of the moment. He used his trademark saying “Well well well” sparingly, drawing a huge cheer whenever he did so.

R. L. got limited mainstream success; his remixed song “It’s Bad You Know” appeared on “The Sopranos” in 1999 or so and his 2001 live album Burnside on Burnside was critically acclaimed and a modest hit.

Even as R. L. got more popular, he was in the twilight of his life. After a heart attack in 2001 he tried to stop drinking but found he couldn’t play as well. His health problems limited his touring, and finally R. L. died in 2005 at the age of 78.

MP3: “The Criminal Inside Me”

MP3: “Tojo Told Hitler”

MP3: “Boogie Chillen”

MP3: “Snake Drive”

MP3: “Georgia Women”

MP3: “Chain Of Fools”

R. L. Burnside page at Fat Possum Records