Archive for Don Henley

Your Sister’s (Record) Rack: Eagles

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , on May 14, 2011 by 30daysout

For years I’ve been one of the millions of Eagles haters out there – including the most famous, the Dude: “I hate the fuckin’ Eagles, man!” And don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of very good reasons to hate the Eagles. But you know, the Eagles aren’t at No. 1 on my “hate” list any more. That spot now belongs to Billy Joel – but that’s another story, for another time.

When they came out of Southern California in 1972, the Eagles were influenced by the era’s country rock, pioneered by Gram Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers. They were a slicked-down distant cousin to Buffalo Springfield’s country rock excursions, even more pallid and meek than Poco.  Among the many adjectives attached to the Eagles included “soulless,” “insincere” and “phony.” People hated the Eagles for their self-satisfaction, misogyny, false emotions and their aspiration to pop success. Any of this criticism of the Eagles, truth to be told, could have been successfully also laid at the feet of any of the big Southern California acts of the day (Linda Ronstadt, Fleetwood Mac, Jackson Browne, America).

But it was easier to hate the Eagles – they personified everything we despised about L.A. at the time and became the biggest band in the world. Today I want to spin their 1975 LP One Of These Nights, which helped to make them international superstars. The band – Don Henley, Randy Meisner, Glenn Frey, Bernie Leadon and Don Felder – had already put out three albums and Henley had gone on record saying he wanted to push the band in the direction of hard rock before the third album, On The Border. Fans learned that what you get with the Eagles was not always necessarily what was promised – the so-called hard rock songs from On The Border, like “Already Gone” were nowhere near what was considered hard rock of the day (Led Zeppelin).

So when Henley promised a turn toward R&B for One Of These Nights, you got the song “One Of These Nights.” With its thumping beat and high-register vocal (by Henley) the song reflected the Eagles’ idea of R&B. Had it come out a few years later, it would certainly have been called disco. But the lyrics reflect a dark, occult sensuality that threads through other songs on the album.

The darkness continues on “Too Many Hands,” written by Meisner and Felder and sung by Meisner. Now you could make a case for Henley’s hard rock on this tune, as Felder and Frey deliver some tasty rockin’ guitar leads. This song is about a girl who has had “too many hands” on her and though “she’s lost all her glory” her heart “is still yearning to be found.” Henley could be singing about the same woman on “Hollywood Waltz,” but this song’s tone is one of sadness, sung to a sweet country-rock steel guitar played by Leadon. Here you can detect the seeds of Don Henley’s later solo career – but give ’em credit, “Hollywood Waltz” may be the most humane set of lyrics he’s written.

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New John Fogerty single debuts today

Posted in News with tags , , , on August 4, 2009 by 30daysout

Fogerty

John Fogerty’s new single, a cover of the Everly Brothers’ “When Will I Be Loved?” is scheduled to debut today on his official website.  The track is from his new album The Blue Ridge Rangers Rides Again, coming out Sept. 1 – grammatical errors and all.  The album features guest appearances from former Eagles Don Henley and Timothy B. Schmidt, and Bruce Springsteen who duets with Fogerty on “When Will I Be Loved?”

As he did on the first Blue Ridge Rangers album (1973) Fogerty dusts off a bunch of covers – the new album features John Prine’s “Paradise,” Buck Owens’ “I Don’t Care,” Delaney and Bonnie’s “Never Ending Song of Love” and John Denver’s “Back Home Again,” as well as Fogerty’s own “Change in the Weather.”

John Fogerty official website

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Who’s Crying Now? Journey, Eagles and Wal-Mart

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , on June 10, 2008 by 30daysout

 

There really is nothing fancy about Wal-Mart. People don’t care what they look like when they go shopping there, prices are low, and if you can find a family of four with a full set of teeth at the store by my house, I’ll buy you lunch. But somehow, the nation’s No. 1 retailer has become the venue of choice for classic rockers to sell their product.

We here at 30 Days Out laughed when The Eagles (we mostly made fun of Don Henley who hates corporations who make money, except when it serves his interest) said they were only selling their first album in nearly 30 years, Long Road Out of Eden, exclusively at Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club. Several million copies later, the joke is on us. Now Journey with new lead singer Arnel Pineda, and later this year, AC/DC will be hawking their stuff in the land of the dentally challenged.

Although we laughed, the business model is genius. Wal-Mart is hyping these releases like they are the Second Coming with big displays and videos playing all over the store. There is no way these guys (maybe the Eagles would) get this type of coverage if they were in every store. They would end up, as Billy Joel once said, “in the discount rack like another can of beans.” 

It’s nice to see the classic rockers getting over. A lot of these guys are still making great music, and most of them are never heard because radio refuses to play their new stuff and record companies fail to promote them properly. So bands like the Eagles and Journey decided to go where their demographic shops. Pure genius. As for Wal-Mart, it might single-handedly save the CD.  Don’t Stop Believin’.

 MP3: “Don’t Stop Believin'” by Journey (2008 version)