Archive for Eagles

Here We Are Again: Happy New Year!

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 27, 2011 by 30daysout

Here’s hoping you had a fine 2011 … and that you will experience a great 2012. See you in the new year.

MP3: “Happy New Year Baby” by Johnny Otis & His Orchestra

MP3: “Merry Christmas, Happy New Year” by Lee “Scratch” Perry & Sandra Robinson

MP3: “New Year’s Resolution” by Otis Redding & Carla Thomas

MP3: “Queer For The New Year” by Blowfly (Not Safe For Work!)

MP3: “New Year’s Resolution” by Donovan

MP3: “Funky New Year” by the Eagles

MP3: “Corrido de Auld Lang Syne” by Little Bobby Rey & Band

MP3: “Sing The Changes” (live) by Paul McCartney

MP3: “The Great Hank” (live) by Robert Earl Keen

MP3: “Party At Ground Zero” by Fishbone

MP3: “My New Year’s Wish For You” by Franklin MacCormack

MP3: “Happy New Year” by ABBA

MP3: “Happy New Year Blues” by Mary Harris

MP3: “Happy New Year” by Lightnin’ Hopkins

MP3: “The End’s Not Near” by Band of Horses

MP3: “Happy New Year” by the Twins

MP3: “Auld Lang Syne” by Chris Isaak

MP3: “New Year”s Eve” by Tom Waits

YouTube: “New Year’s Day” by U2

Your Sister’s (Record) Rack: Eagles

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , on May 14, 2011 by 30daysout

For years I’ve been one of the millions of Eagles haters out there – including the most famous, the Dude: “I hate the fuckin’ Eagles, man!” And don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of very good reasons to hate the Eagles. But you know, the Eagles aren’t at No. 1 on my “hate” list any more. That spot now belongs to Billy Joel – but that’s another story, for another time.

When they came out of Southern California in 1972, the Eagles were influenced by the era’s country rock, pioneered by Gram Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers. They were a slicked-down distant cousin to Buffalo Springfield’s country rock excursions, even more pallid and meek than Poco.  Among the many adjectives attached to the Eagles included “soulless,” “insincere” and “phony.” People hated the Eagles for their self-satisfaction, misogyny, false emotions and their aspiration to pop success. Any of this criticism of the Eagles, truth to be told, could have been successfully also laid at the feet of any of the big Southern California acts of the day (Linda Ronstadt, Fleetwood Mac, Jackson Browne, America).

But it was easier to hate the Eagles – they personified everything we despised about L.A. at the time and became the biggest band in the world. Today I want to spin their 1975 LP One Of These Nights, which helped to make them international superstars. The band – Don Henley, Randy Meisner, Glenn Frey, Bernie Leadon and Don Felder – had already put out three albums and Henley had gone on record saying he wanted to push the band in the direction of hard rock before the third album, On The Border. Fans learned that what you get with the Eagles was not always necessarily what was promised – the so-called hard rock songs from On The Border, like “Already Gone” were nowhere near what was considered hard rock of the day (Led Zeppelin).

So when Henley promised a turn toward R&B for One Of These Nights, you got the song “One Of These Nights.” With its thumping beat and high-register vocal (by Henley) the song reflected the Eagles’ idea of R&B. Had it come out a few years later, it would certainly have been called disco. But the lyrics reflect a dark, occult sensuality that threads through other songs on the album.

The darkness continues on “Too Many Hands,” written by Meisner and Felder and sung by Meisner. Now you could make a case for Henley’s hard rock on this tune, as Felder and Frey deliver some tasty rockin’ guitar leads. This song is about a girl who has had “too many hands” on her and though “she’s lost all her glory” her heart “is still yearning to be found.” Henley could be singing about the same woman on “Hollywood Waltz,” but this song’s tone is one of sadness, sung to a sweet country-rock steel guitar played by Leadon. Here you can detect the seeds of Don Henley’s later solo career – but give ’em credit, “Hollywood Waltz” may be the most humane set of lyrics he’s written.

Continue reading

Let It Rock … But Don’t Spill The Wine!

Posted in Rock Rant with tags , , , , , , on July 18, 2010 by 30daysout

Editor’s Note:  Our L.A. correspondent Randy Fuller has written a post for his excellent wine blog Now and Zin on wine and rock and roll.  He has graciously allowed us to reprint this post – and we’ve included links to some of the songs referenced in the copy.  And at the end, we have added a few “bonus” songs of our own.)

One of my many joys in life is music.  I love gathering mp3s of songs together in a thematic group and burning them to a CD.  I use these CDs to pass the hour and a half or so each day I spend behind the wheel of the car.

Another of my many joys is wine, so it’s not too much of a stretch for me to assemble a compilation of songs about wine.

It’s difficult to find too many songs about wine that are actually about the wine.   Most wine songs are lyrically concerned with over-imbibing: getting drunk on wine, staying high all the time, etc.   I was certainly no saint in my younger days, but at this point in my life I try to promote only the responsible use of alcoholic beverages.  Besides, I drink wine to enjoy the experience of the wine, not to get blasted.

Wine has a rather seedy image in some of the more well-known wine classics.  The Tom Paxton song, “Bottle Of Wine,” deals with the trials and tribulations of panhandling for spare change in order to buy some fruit of the vine.  Many other songs deal with the soft underbelly of the wine drinking populace, too.  In “Drinking Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee,” also known as “Wine, Wine, Wine,” the singer has a nickel and only needs another dime to afford the desired bottle.  You’d be hard-pressed to match that in today’s economy, even at 7-11.

Jerry Jeff Walker’s “Sangria Wine” is all about the camaraderie of wine – which is great – but his delivery gets more liquid as the song progresses. It ends up with a “slumped-in-the-lawn-chair” sort of feeling that isn’t exactly unpleasant, just maybe a little undesirable.

“Red, Red Wine” was penned by Neil Diamond in the 1960s and performed by a wide variety of singers since then. In it, the wine “goes to my head, makes me forget.” That’s touching, but most counselors will tell you it’s a bad idea to try and hide from your troubles in a bottle of wine.  (Included here is the UB40 version of “Red, Red Wine” which was an international hit in 1983.)

In similar fashion, “Two More Bottles of Wine,” “Wine Do Yer Stuff” and a host of others deal with wine as a crutch or escape from reality.

“Spill The Wine,” the great 1970 hit by Eric Burdon and War, is about a dream where wine is involved. To me it always seemed like a dream induced by something harder than wine.

Lee Hazelwood’s “Summer Wine, which took him and Nancy Sinatra to the top 40 in the mid-’60s, is the flip side of that dream in “Spill The Wine.” There’s no happy ending, though. Eventually, the summer wine runs empty.

I prefer songs about wine made from grapes, so I’ll toss out “Sweet Cherry Wine,” “Elderberry Wine” and “Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon Wine.”  Who needs wine made from old dogs, children and watermelons?

Continue reading

Review: “Mudcrutch,” Mudcrutch

Posted in Review with tags , , , , on April 30, 2008 by 30daysout

 

It’s no big secret that Mudcrutch, the band, is the Gainesville, Florida, band that served as the prototype for Tom Petty’s Heartbreakers.  Petty is back at the mic for the 2008 version of Mudcrutch, also featuring Heartbreakers keyboardist Benmont Tench and guitarist Mike Campbell.  Original Mudcrutch members Randall Marsh (drums) and Tom Leadon (guitar), brother of Eagles and Flying Burrito Brothers member Bernie Leadon, are also in the lineup.  Mudcrutch is a 14-song catalog of country rock and apparent Heartbreakers outtakes that wouldn’t have diverted anyone’s attention from the Eagles or the Byrds if it had been released in the early 1970s.  Those two groups are the obvious touchstones here – “Lover Of The Bayou” is indeed a Byrds tune, one of three cover songs on the album, and “Orphan Of The Storm” (another Katrina-related song) has an Eagles-like lilt.  Leadon takes over lead vocals on “Queen Of The Go-Go Girls” and Tench and Campbell even sing a bit on the album too. “Scare Easy” has that familiar Heartbreakers sound and will likely be the bait that lures the listener inside.  Recorded in a two-week period, this is a little too accomplished to pass off as garage rock but Mudcrutch is a perfect throwback to those early ’70s days when bands knew how to play and, uh, take it easy.

MP3: Scare Easy

Mudcrutch official website