Archive for Little Feat

Cold? Fix up a pot of gumbo!

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , , , , , on February 28, 2013 by 30daysout
snowb

You think these ladies are ready for spring break?

Editor’s note: Since the cold weather has doubled down on the country, thought we’d do the same thing with our warm recipes. Today, a reblog of a recent item on Louisiana gumbo.

Ooh, baby, it’s cold outside! In Texas that means it’s about 53 degrees, and a warm front is going to blow back from the Gulf tomorrow, kickin’ everything up to about 75. Hey, we take what winter we can get. Anyway, let’s dig out a deep pot and make some gumbo today.

Gumbo is, of course, that stew-like dish popular in South Louisiana and crummy restaurants across the country. Although it apparently originated in New Orleans, gumbo is most closely associated with the Cajuns of South Louisiana – like my mother from Catahoula and my dad from Cecilia.  Those folks used to make gumbo that was thicker than Atchafalaya Basin swamp water.

Hwy AJ Crawfish GS-297x300

A.J. Judice

I don’t know how they did it – our good friend Dr. Michael DeBakey (from Lake Charles, La.) used to insist the secret to good, thick gumbo was okra. And he lived to be 99 years old and was pretty much always right …  so who knows?

And our good buddy A.J. Judice used to say “good gumbo is the secret to a happy life,” but he never told us how to make it. He knew a lot of stuff about a lot of stuff, or at least he said he did. “When you know, you know,” he used to say in his thick Cajun accent, “and when you don’t know … it’s hard to know.” But we loved him anyway.

OK, let’s get started. The important thing about gumbo is that it always needs a roux. This is made by melting equal parts butter and flour (about 2 tablespoons each) and heating it up until it’s chocolate brown.  If this sounds too hard, you can always buy a mix like Zatarain’s Gumbo Base. Or you can buy the stuff pre-made in a jar (Douget’s Rice Milling company makes a fine roux).  Once you got this goin’, the rest of it comes together like this:

Chicken, 2 1/2 to 3-pound cut up, or boneless chicken cooked

Sausage (that packaged stuff in the supermarket is fine)

1 1/2 quarts water or chicken stock

1 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped green pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Put your roux, water, veggies and seasonings in a deep pot.  Heat it all up to boiling, toss in the meat and simmer it for about five beers.  Serve this on hot rice.   MMMM!

If you don’t like our recipe, you can check out these tried and true sources:

Chef Paul Prudhomme’s gumbo recipe

Chicken and andouille gumbo recipe from Tabasco

Alton Brown’s shrimp gumbo recipe (Food Network)

And finally, here are a few tunes you can play while fixin’ your gumbo.

MP3: “Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya” by Dr. John the Night Tripper

MP3: “Gumbo” by Phish

MP3: “Casses Mes Objets (You Broke My Stuff)” by Mama Rosin

MP3: “Allons a Grand Coteau” by Clifton Chenier

MP3: “La Jolie Fleur Dubois (The Beautiful Flower of the Wood)” by The Revelers

MP3: “Fire On The Bayou” by the Neville Brothers

MP3: “Rad Gumbo” (live) by Little Feat

 

Is it cold? Fix up some gumbo!

Posted in Rock Rant with tags , , , , , on January 4, 2013 by 30daysout
snowb

The ladies look like they are pretty cold.

Ooh, baby, it’s cold outside! In Texas that means it’s about 53 degrees, and a warm front is going to blow back from the Gulf tomorrow, kickin’ everything up to about 75. Hey, we take what winter we can get. Anyway, let’s dig out a deep pot and make some gumbo today.

Gumbo is, of course, that stew-like dish popular in South Louisiana and crummy restaurants across the country. Although it apparently originated in New Orleans, gumbo is most closely associated with the Cajuns of South Louisiana – like my mother from Catahoula and my dad from Cecilia.  Those folks used to make gumbo that was thicker than Atchafalaya Basin swamp water.

Hwy AJ Crawfish GS-297x300

A.J. Judice knew a lot of stuff.

I don’t know how they did it – our good friend Dr. Michael DeBakey (from Lake Charles, La.) used to insist the secret to good, thick gumbo was okra. And he lived to be 99 years old and was pretty much always right …  so who knows?

And our good buddy A.J. Judice used to say “good gumbo is the secret to a happy life,” but he never told us how to make it. He knew a lot of stuff about a lot of stuff, or at least he said he did. “When you know, you know,” he used to say in his thick Cajun accent, “and when you don’t know … it’s hard to know.” But we loved him anyway.

OK, let’s get started. The important thing about gumbo is that it always needs a roux. This is made by melting equal parts butter and flour (about 2 tablespoons each) and heating it up until it’s chocolate brown.  If this sounds too hard, you can always buy a mix like Zatarain’s Gumbo Base. Or you can buy the stuff pre-made in a jar (Douget’s Rice Milling company makes a fine roux).  Once you got this goin’, the rest of it comes together like this:

Chicken, 2 1/2 to 3-pound cut up, or boneless chicken cooked

Sausage (that packaged stuff in the supermarket is fine)

1 1/2 quarts water or chicken stock

1 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup chopped green pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Put your roux, water, veggies and seasonings in a deep pot.  Heat it all up to boiling, toss in the meat and simmer it for about five beers.  Serve this on hot rice.   MMMM!

If you don’t like our recipe, you can check out these tried and true sources:

Chef Paul Prudhomme’s gumbo recipe

Chicken and andouille gumbo recipe from Tabasco

Alton Brown’s shrimp gumbo recipe (Food Network)

And finally, here are a few tunes you can play while fixin’ your gumbo.

MP3: “Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya” by Dr. John the Night Tripper

MP3: “Gumbo” by Phish

MP3: “Casses Mes Objets (You Broke My Stuff)” by Mama Rosin

MP3: “Allons a Grand Coteau” by Clifton Chenier

MP3: “La Jolie Fleur Dubois (The Beautiful Flower of the Wood)” by The Revelers

MP3: “Fire On The Bayou” by the Neville Brothers

MP3: “Rad Gumbo” (live) by Little Feat

Video Du Jour: Little Feat

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , , , on July 18, 2012 by 30daysout

Let’s keep the groove movin’ today with a new one from the venerable Little Feat – “Rooster Rag,” the title track from their first album in nine years.

You can see that’s keyboard ace Bill Payne doing the lead vocals, and nice to see Paul Barrere on guitar, Kenny Gradney on bass and the redoubtable Fred Tackett on mandolin and backing vocals.

Little Feat official web site (free download of “Rooster Rag”)

On The Road Again

Posted in Rock Rant with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2012 by 30daysout

It may not look like much in the photo, but this is the largest convenience store in the world.

In most places around the country, gasoline prices are dipping. You know what that means – summer’s here and the time is right for piling the kids and/or the dog into the car for a road trip.

We were on the road this past week, and deep in the heart of the Lone Star state we wheeled in to a truly awe-inspiring site: the Buc-ee’s truck stop/convenience store just north of New Braunfels, Texas, between San Antonio and Austin.

Buc-ee’s is a chain of stores found along the highways of Texas. They sell typical convenience store junk food, some hot kolaches and fudge and their own brand of beef jerky, hot peanuts, etc. They also sell a wide variety of knick-knacks, cheap Texas souvenirs and similar crap. We’ll get back to that in a moment.

But this Buc-ee’s we visited, it was friggin’ massive! It was at least the size of a Walmart and sure enough, my research tells me at 68,000 square feet it is truly the largest convenience store in the world (Wikipedia is your friend). It also has 60 gas pumps, about 78 toilets and 250 employees.

The Buc-ee’s beaver mascot.

This is the largest store in the Buc-ee’s chain and I’m told when it opened in May there were cars stretched up and down the frontage road just waiting to get in there. People in Texas love Buc-ee’s for some reason; everywhere, I see people wearing t-shirts with the logo featuring a goofy cartoon beaver. Instead of a Disneyland or Six Flags shirt; like Buc-ee’s is the destination tourists really want to make pilgrimage to.

Anyway, back to the crap they sell in the store. There’s a huge rack of CDs, mostly country music, but because it’s Texas the selection is considerably more choice than your typical roadside truck stop. You got yer George Jones, yer Willie Nelson, some Ray Price and even a disc of Johnny Bush. A Dolly Parton disc and wow, even Robert Earl Keen! Unfortunately, there’s Pat Green too.

There were some copies of the great series from New West Records, Live From Austin TX – glorious audio tracks of performances from the great “Austin City Limits” TV show. Here’s Willie Nelson on the show, Robert Earl Keen, Billy Joe Shaver, Kris Kristofferson, even the Texas Tornados (which IMO is the best of the series). You don’t have to go to Buc-ee’s to find these; your friendly neighborhood record store ought to have a good selection, or you can shop online.

There are also discs from Icehouse Music, a company that rack-jobs music from Texas, Americana and roots artists. That’s the label where you can find the great Johnny Bush (he wrote “Whiskey River” for Willie) and his autobiographical Kashmere Gardens Mud, as well as the incredible two-disc tribute to Guy Clark This One’s For Him: A Tribute to Guy Clark, which features Robert Earl, Willie, Joe Ely, Steve Earle, Emmylou Harris and many more.

Some years ago I picked up a CD at a truck stop, California Jukebox by the Flying Burrito Brothers. Now this isn’t the Gram Parsons-Chris Hillman Burritos, it’s the 21st century version, with John Beland and Gib Guilbeau and featuring guest shots from David Allan Coe, Waylon Jennings, Sonny Landreth and even original Flying Burrito steel guitarist “Sneaky Pete” Kleinow. It came out in 2001 from the last incarnation in a long line of imitation Flying Burrito Brothers. It overcomes low expectations and it was a pleasant surprise for me – dig one up if you can. It’s on Icehouse Records, apparently no relation to Icehouse Music above.

Well, this tirade has arrived at a place far from where we started – that’s a nice summer road trip. So, for your summer road trip, here’s a soundtrack for ya.

MP3: “On The Road Again” (live at Austin City Limits) by Willie Nelson

MP3: “White Line Fever” by Joe Ely

MP3: “Truckstop in La Grange” by the Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash

MP3: “Bloody Mary Morning” by Johnny Bush

MP3 ” (Is Anybody Goin’ To) San Antone/Texas Tornado” (live at Austin City Limits) by the Sir Douglas Quintet

MP3: “Endless Highway” by The Band

MP3: “Automobile” by John Prine

MP3: “Truck Stop Girl” by Little Feat

MP3: “Highway Cafe” by Kinky Friedman

MP3: “California Jukebox” by the Flying Burrito Brothers

MP3: “Honkin’ Down The Highway” by the Beach Boys

MP3: “Goin’ Down To Mexico” by ZZ Top

MP3: “Roadhouse Blues” by The Doors w/John Lee Hooker

MP3: “Sweet Hitch-Hiker (live) by John Fogerty

MP3: “Life Is A Highway” by the Tom Cochrane Band

MP3: “I’ve Been Everywhere” by Johnny Cash

MP3: “Highway Star” by Deep Purple

MP3: “Let Me Drive Your Automobile” (live at Woodstock 40th anniversary) by Canned Heat

MP3: “Born To Be Wild” by Steppenwolf

MP3: “Call Me The Breeze” (live) by Lynyrd Skynyrd

MP3: “The Road Goes On Forever” (live at Austin City Limits) by Robert Earl Keen

Keep the New Year Rollin’ – Live with Little Feat

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , , on January 2, 2012 by 30daysout

Lowell George of Little Feat

Despite it being a new work week, let’s keep the New Year’s vibe goin’ for just a little longer. Hope you liked that live Doors stuff as much as I did. Today let’s dip in to more live music, this time from another band that was always killer on stage – Little Feat.

During the early 1970s musicians still hung over from the Sixties scrambled to find a niche for themselves along a musical horizon that was broader than ever. Even with all the choices available at the time, Little Feat was still hard to pigeonhole. The band melted rock, blues, country, New Orleans swing and whacked-out psychedelia into a tasty stew. The Feat debuted in 1971 but made its biggest impact with Dixie Chicken in 1973.

Led by Lowell George, these boys liked to play – and by the time they finally produced an official live album (Waiting For Columbus, in 1978) they were one of the tightest touring outfits around. That was the beginning of the end of Little Feat’s first chapter: Lowell George died in 1979 of a drug overdose. However most of the classic unit, led by pianist Bill Payne, guitarist Paul Barrere and drummer Richie Hayward, soldiered on with a variety of lead singers.

The Feat is one of those bands who’s always cool with amateur tapers, so there are literally thousands of shows out there and their live material is fairly easy to find on the web. Oh, and these boys aren’t in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame! Unbelieveable.

The only time I ever attended a show at Houston’s venerable Liberty Hall was a Little Feat gig in 1973 or 1974. I remember being totally impressed with George’s charisma as a frontman, and with his multitasking on stage as he often sang, played lead guitar and pounded rhythm on cowbells and stuff all at the same time. So I’ve included a couple cuts – “Sailin’ Shoes” and “Tripe Face Boogie” – from Liberty Hall, most likely one of the shows I attended.

Little Feat has released an excellent, import-only, three disc live set – 40 Feat: The Hot Tomato Anthology features choice live cuts from every era of the band.

MP3: “Sailin’ Shoes”

MP3: “Tripe Face Boogie”

MP3: “Teenage Nervous Breakdown”

MP3: “Oh, Atlanta”

MP3: “Let It Roll”

YouTube: “Dixie Chicken” with Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris and Jesse Winchester on the TV show “Midnight Special” (1977)

YouTube: “Fat Man In The Bathtub” from 1976

Little Feat official website

Sampler Daze: WB/Reprise Loss Leaders, Part 7

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 16, 2009 by 30daysout

hardgoods deepear

By 1974, radio’s hard rock trend was going strong – Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Humble Pie dominated the FM rock airwaves.  Appropriately titled for the time, Hard Goods arrived in mailboxes with freshly minted rockers like Montrose, covering Roy Brown’s “Good Rocking Tonight” and Foghat, offering its cover of Buddy Holly’s “That’ll Be The Day.”  Ted Nugent and his Amboy Dukes show up, and the perfect marriage between glam and hard rock emerges in the then-new KISS (Casablanca Records were distributed by Warner Bros. until about 1976).

The Doobie Brothers were still rockin’ behind guitarist/vocalist Tom Johnston and they were fresh off their 1973 triumph The Captain and Me.  The Doobies’ new “Pursuit On 53rd Street” had a guitar crunch similar to the monster single “China Grove” but behind the scenes, Johnston’s health was becoming precarious.  He was able to stick with the Doobies through late 1974 even as new personnel were added, most notably ex-Steely Dan guitarist Jeff “Skunk” Baxter.  Finally in early 1975 Johnston had to quit the band, and a replacement was found in another Steely Dan alumnus, Michael McDonald.  The Doobies quickly became McDonald’s franchise, and everyone’s heard the rest of the story – with more than 30 million albums sold, the Doobies are still an active touring band with a rejuvenated Tom Johnston at the helm.

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Sampler Daze: The WB/Reprise Loss Leaders All-Star Team

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 5, 2009 by 30daysout
arlo-guthrie-peacep01-ga

Arlo Guthrie

We take a short break from our exhaustive, year-by-year look at the Warner/Reprise Loss Leaders to cite a few of the artists who appeared throughout this series with great music.  We could call it our Loss Leaders All-Star Team.  Between 1969 and 1980, the label issued 35 samplers that were available to the public, and these artists were perennials.

Arlo Guthrie – Woody’s son made 13 appearances in the Loss Leaders series, appearing on the very first sampler in 1969 with “The Pause Of Mr. Claus,” a performance that features one of his trademark comedic rap/song combinations.  The best known of these is of course “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree,” the nearly-19-minute-long song that made Guthrie famous in 1967 and is played on hip radio stations every Thanksgiving.  Arlo hit the top 40 in 1972 with his version of Steve Goodman’s “City of New Orleans,” and he cut 14 albums for Warner Bros. before the label dropped him in 1983.

Randy Newman

Randy Newman

Randy Newman – Like Guthrie, Newman was one of those hard-to-market artists but he nevertheless earned a critical following when he first appeared in 1968.  Known for writing satiric songs (often from the point of view of a reprehensible character) with beautiful melodies, Newman actually penned hit songs for other artists (“Mama Told Me Not To Come” was a hit for Three Dog Night) and had a few hits of his own, including “Short People” (1977) and “I Love L.A.” (1983).  Newman is a runner-up to Arlo, with 12 appearances in the Loss Leaders series.

Frank Zappa/The Mothers of Invention – Zappa and/or his band made 11 total appearances in the Loss Leaders, they even gave him his own one-disc sampler in 1970 (Zapped) to showcase all the artists on his Bizarre/Straight labels.

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