Archive for Music by the Slice

SXSW: The Young and the Old

Posted in SXSW with tags , , , , , on March 20, 2010 by 30daysout

Boots Riley, left, and Tom Morello in the Street Sweeper Social Club

The death of Alex Chilton may have put a bit of a chill on the SXSW festival in Austin this weekend, but many of the younger people who don’t know the work of this genuine original couldn’t care less.  They are here to see the thousands of new faces visiting Texas in the springtime of their careers, and to hear some fine music.  When the occasional big name drops in that’s just icing on the cake but they do tend to steal the spotlight away from the showcases of up-and-coming talent.

Friday night the line to get into the not-so-secret Muse show at Stubb’s snaked all the way down Red River, an even more impressive queue than Metallica mustered last year.  Those without those cool badges or VIP designations were out of luck, and many lined the roof of a nearby parking garage to get a glimpse of the light show and hear a snatch of music.

The Jim Jones Revue

Badgeless and wristband-less, we plunged headlong into the music on a sunny Friday, sampling the tasty sounds of Music By The Slice at Home Style Pizza, which is part of the South Congress scene quickly growing to rival the antics of better-known Sixth Street.  We caught electro-poppers the Woodhands, from Toronto, who had a fine set of melodic emo.  Lead singer Dan Werb plays a Roland “key-tar” while drummer Paul Banwatt keeps a steady beat.  Local faves A Giant Dog kept the between-set energy going with some really nice garage band rock.

We hoofed it to a grassy field on the Sixth Street on the other side of the freeway for the Mess With Texas festival, wishing to see the Jim Jones Revue from England.  We reviewed these guys a while back and were eager to see how their high-energy rock and roll translated live.  No disappointments here, even though lead vocalist/guitarist Jim Jones was a bit rough-voiced from playing the night before, and there were some audio problems.  But they played it in the red – and guitarist Rupert Orton kept dipping back into his bag of truly nasty lead work, while piano player Elliott Mortimer became the crazed offspring of the Faces’ Ian McLagan.  Man, these guys are great!

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