Archive for Talking Heads

Happy New Year!

Posted in Rock Moment with tags , , , , , , , on December 28, 2012 by 30daysout

new year pin-up1

Here’s hoping you had a fine 2012 … and that you will experience a great 2013. See you in the new year.

Here’s a little New Year’s Eve playlist, complete with a few apocalyptic “over the cliff” tunes tossed in.

MP3: “Happy New Year Baby” by Johnny Otis & His Orchestra

MP3: “New Year’s Eve” by Tom Waits

MP3: “Happy New Year” by ABBA

MP3: “What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve” by The Head and the Heart

MP3: “New Year’s Resolution” by Otis Redding & Carla Thomas

MP3: “Don’t Drink and Drive, Duh”  Public Service Announcement by Pee Wee Herman

MP3: “Queer For The New Year” by Blowfly (NSFW)

MP3: “Happy New Year” by Lightnin’ Hopkins

MP3: “Funky New Year” by the Eagles

MP3: “Auld Lang Syne” by Rod Stewart

YouTube: New Year’s Eve Countdown/”Sugar Magnolia” by the Grateful Dead, 1980

MP3: “Life During Wartime” (live) by Talking Heads

MP3: “Soylent Green” by Carbon/Silicon

MP3: “Dancing With Myself” by Billy Idol

MP3: “Party At Ground Zero” by Fishbone

Sampler Daze: The WB/Reprise Loss Leaders, Part 14

Posted in Lost Classics! with tags , , , , , , , on October 8, 2009 by 30daysout

eclipse troublemakers

And so we reach a new decade, the third decade in which Loss Leaders samplers appeared, and a radically changed landscape from the old hippie daze.  To get your hands on Eclipse, the first two-LP sampler from 1980, you had to pay three dollars now, only a buck more but a 50 percent increase from 1979 prices.  The liner notes had the air of a valedictory: “Eclipse is the first Warner Bros. sampler of a new decade and commemorates the occasion by presenting vital works by several artists whose careers span the lifetime of the entire ‘loss leader’ project … as well as material by artists as new as the decade itself.”

Sure enough, there’s Van Morrison with “Troubadours” and Randy Newman with “It’s Money That I Love,” a long way from their appearances on the first Loss Leaders album in 1969.  Perennials include Bonnie Raitt, with a cover of Robert Palmer’s “You’re Gonna Get What’s Coming”; Ry Cooder, with “Little Sister”; Leo Sayer with “When The Money Runs Out” and good ol’ Little Feat going “Down On The Farm.”  Then there was Carlene Carter, who had some of the best bloodlines in music: the daughter of country music greats June Carter and Carl Smith, her stepfather was Johnny Cash and her husband at the time was Nick Lowe.  The husband had perhaps the greatest influence on her music, as she turns in a version of Elvis Costello’s “Radio Sweetheart.”

And there’s good old rock and roll: former Doobie Brothers frontman Tom Johnston crunches through “Outlaw” while the Dukes ask “Who’s Gonna Tell You.”  The Dukes comprised former members of Brit rockers Stone the Crow, Savoy Brown and Be Bop Deluxe.  One member, former Wings guitarist Jimmy McCullough, died just as the band’s first album was released.  Funkadelic offers “Field Maneuvers,” while Woodstock veterans Sly and the Family Stone check in with “Remember Who You Are” and Bob Marley and the Wailers give up “Wake Up and Live.”  Talking Heads, with “Drugs” and the Ramones, with ” I Want You Around,” point the way for the future of American music – and for the Loss Leaders.  Eclipse would be the final sampler that showcased artists with mainstream styles.

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Review: “Everything That Happens …” by David Byrne & Brian Eno

Posted in Review with tags , , , on November 12, 2008 by 30daysout

db-be-2008

Both David Byrne and Brian Eno are pretty much absorbed into the world of music – their influence is everywhere, while they pop up in the flesh only occasionally.  Eno was most recently in the spotlight thanks to his production work on Coldplay’s Viva La Vida, while Byrne has been involved with a lot of quirky artsy-fartsy projects (including his internet-only Radio David Byrne).  So now the two have reunited for the new Everything That Happens Will Happen Today, an album of rock tunes that sound a lot like the Talking Heads.   Except for the parts where it sounds like The Joshua Tree (the U2 classic produced by Eno).  The songs veer from danceable pop in “Strange Overtones” to almost-country on “My Big Nurse.”  “The River” builds into a ringing vocal chorale that almost evokes a rural church house, and “Everything That Happens” could be the soundtrack of a David Lynch movie.  “Life Is Long,” with its tasty horn  and guitar parts, would be played on any radio that used to play Talking Heads (those kinds of stations pretty much don’t exist any more).  I didn’t think I’d enjoy this album as much as I did – if anything the Talking Heads did ever excited you, you ought to check this one out.  

MP3: “Strange Overtones”

David Byrne official website

Stream the entire album here